Where is the Power Steering Reservoir Located?

Would you like to top up your power steering fluid reservoir and you thought to ask, where is the power steering reservoir located?

Search no further because, in this article, you would get to know how to easily identify the power steering fluid reservoir of your vehicle, where it is located, and tips to note as you work on your power steering fluid reservoir.

The power steering fluid reservoir is located close to your vehicle’s engine, having either a yellow or white color with a black cap.
 

You will also get to know how to identify issues with your power steering system, sounds to look out for when turning your steering wheels, how to top up your power steering fluid, and tips for a healthy power steering mechanism of your car.

Let’s get started!

Where Is the Power Steering Reservoir Located?

The power steering fluid reservoir is located underneath the hood of a vehicle. It’s typically located on the passenger side of the vehicle, where the belts of a smaller or transverse-mounted engine are situated. The power steering reservoir is located on the driver’s side of some other types of engines.

The reservoir will likely say “Steering” on top, whether embossed or lying beneath protective layers like plastic or cardboard. The reason why there would be several different locations for the reservoir is that larger vehicles need more fluid and front-wheel drive vehicles are more compact, so they have less room to accommodate such objects.

A power steering reservoir is a container where the steering fluid from the power cylinder flows in and through, then ultimately back to the pump.

What Are the Symptoms of Low Power Steering Fluid?

A good rule of thumb that will indicate that your power steering fluid is low is the feeling you get from your steering wheel. When your power steering fluid Is low, your steering will show one of the signs below:

1. Difficulty Turning the Wheel

There can be other reasons you might experience difficulty turning your steering, but the majority of the time is due to a low power steering fluid. Hence in a situation, your week feels hard/tough when steering, do check the level of your power steering fluid and top up if necessary.

2. Loud Steering

Your steering should not make any sound while turning. Hence, if you notice any loud noise while turning your steering, this might just indicate that you need to top up your power steering fluid.

3. Shrill Steering

The shrill sound is one no driver wants to hear when driving, and this may come in the form of a screeching sound while turning your steering wheel. Once you notice this, ensure you have your mechanic check the level of your power steering fluid.

Also, note that this sound does not always come from your steering wheel. It can as well come from under the hood of your car. Hence, make sure you look out for such while driving.

4. Leak Under the Vehicle

Having a stain under your vehicle might be caused by fluid leakage from your vehicle. Different fluids can leak from your vehicle to cause that, you need to certify the fluid leaking. In some cases, you might have a power steering fluid leak, causing a low power steering fluid in the system of your vehicle.

How To Check Power Steering Fluid

How To Check Power Steering Fluid

Would you like to know the level of your power steering fluid, this will help with the decision to top up if the fluid level is low. Below are steps on how to check power steering fluid:

  1. To check the level of your power steering fluid. You need to locate your power steering fluid reservoir. The power steering fluid reservoir is located close to your vehicle’s engine.
  1. Note that other reservoirs are located either next to or above the power steering fluid pump in some vehicles. Some vehicles might feature a remote reservoir that can be located in another position at the bay of the engine.
  1. Clean off the reservoir cap and remove it.
  2. Most vehicle caps feature small dipsticks, which have fluid level indicators. Check if the dipstick is wet at the right level of fluid. If that’s the case, you are good to go.

Note: If your power steering fluid level is low, you will need to top up the fluid.

How to Add Power Steering Fluid to Power Steering Fluid Reservoir

How to Add Power Steering Fluid

When checking your power steering fluid reservoir and you notice a low power steering fluid situation, you will need to add more fluid to this reservoir for a healthy power steering, Here is how you can achieve this task.

  1. Purchase a quart of the right power steering fluid you will need for your vehicle. Be sure to check the owner’s manual for more information on getting the right fluid.
  1. Park your car on a plain, level surface, be sure to set the parking brake.
  1. Roll up loose clothing, or rather, remove them, and be sure to keep your hands away from the cooling system of your vehicle when working on the power steering fluid section of your car. This is because fans can automatically turn on, even with the engine off, which could be hazardous.
  1. Start your engine and let it idle until you reach your vehicle’s normal operating temperature.
  1. With the engine still idling, set your steering wheel to full lock by turning all the way, also turn all the way to the opposite lock. Repeat this process several times.
  1. Switch off the engine and open the hood of your car.
  1. Locate your power steering reservoir. This can be found close to your vehicle’s engine and usually have a yellow or white color with a black cap.
  1. Clean the reservoir using a clean towel, and this will ensure you do not have dirt go into the reservoir when you work on it.
  1. The next step is to check for the level of your power steering fluid, and this could be done by twisting and pulling out the dipstick in some vehicles. You can also lookout for the “MIN” and “MAX” lines of the reservoir to know if you are low on power steering fluid.
  1. If you notice a level of fluid between the “MIN” and “MAX,” this is an indication that you have enough power steering fluid.
  1. However, if you notice a fluid level below the “MIN” line on your power steering fluid reservoir, this means you will need to top up your power steering fluid. Add your power steering fluid, checking the level after adding a small amount. Do not fill the reservoir above the “MAX” line.
  1. After filling to the recommended level, replace the cap and seal tightly.

Frequently Asked Question About Power Steering Reservoir

Where Is the Power Steering Reservoir Located?

The power steering reservoir can be located near the engine of your vehicle, and this is usually a yellow or white reservoir with a black cap. Make sure you wipe the reservoir using a towel to prevent dirt from getting in when you work on it.

Where Do You Fill up Power Steering Fluid?

You can fill up the power steering fluid in the power steering reservoir. This can be located near your car’s engine, having either a yellow or white color with a black cap.

Can Dirty Power Steering Fluid Cause Problems?

Dirty or neglected power steering fluid can cause noise during steering and increase the effort needed to steer your vehicle. It can also reduce steering effectiveness, harden seals and cause leaks and wear of parts such as the power steering rack-and-pinion, which cost about $1,000 to replace.

What Does Lack of Power Steering Fluid Cause?

With a low amount of power steering fluid in the system, air will be circulated around the steering mechanism causing strange sounds when turning the steering wheel. To stop such noises, top up your power steering fluid reservoir, which should end the noises if no leaks occur.

Conclusion

The power steering mechanism of your vehicle is an important part of your car. Hence, it is recommended that you check your power steering fluid at intervals to ensure it is not contaminated.

Notice a significant drop in your power steering fluid level, or you always need to top up the reservoir. This might be a leakage situation, take your car to the mechanic to identify leaks and fix them.

Scott Greene is a seasoned automotive technician for over 5 years and has been deep into advanced automotive diagnostics for a couple of years. He Loves writing about Automotive Diagnostics and Repair, Trouble codes, Buyer guides for various car parts and accessories, and lots more. 

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